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© Fylde Coast Ramblers - This website is compliant with the new EU cookie law Fylde Coast Ramblers is affiliated to the Ramblers Association. Our affiliation number is 591570
Fylde Coast Ramblers logo contact email button facebook link to Fylde Coast Ramblers Happy Blackpool Walking member

More Info

We are a friendly and unpretentious walking club based on the Fylde Coast in Lancashire. We have walks planned for almost every weekend. Transfer to the destinations is mainly by coach, with collection points in St.Annes on Sea, Blackpool, Cleveleys, Thornton Cleveleys and Poulton le Fylde. Popular destinations can be the Lake District, Yorkshire Dales, Derbyshire’s Peak District, North Wales (Snowdonia) and Lancashire. Have a look here to see our future destinations. All walks have experienced leaders and are graded to suit different levels of fitness. Are you interested in friendship through walking? Do you want to get fit? Then take a look at what we do, and how you can join us.
Health Matters text box

Health Matters

Walking is the most natural form of movement, and an excellent all-

round mode of exercise. Yet as a nation we are walking less and less.

Walking can help you to:

    * Improve your general health     * Get fit and stay fit     * Control your weight     * Live longer! Walking helps protect the body from many illnesses and conditions: heart disease and stroke, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, obesity, depression, some types of diabetes and colon cancer. Health experts agree that 30 minutes brisk walking on most days of the week is sufficient to improve fitness. However like a lot of things in life that we are supposed to do, daily exercise can become a chore. A much more enjoyable way is to join us every weekend and walk in the beautiful countryside, with good company. All you need is some sensible clothing/footwear and the price of the coach fare. This gradual start to walking can help people who feel they are not active enough to change their day to day habits through the simple activity of walking more. If your main aim is to lose weight, you need to use more calories through physical activity than you take in as food. This means doing as much as possible: short walks, longer walks, climbing stairs – every bit of physical activity counts toward the total number of calories burned off. If you recovering from an illness/operation and your main aim is to increase your fitness, it is important to gradually increase the intensity of your exercise. This can be achieved by coming on a short walk or part of the C walk. Then as you improve your level of fitness you can take on a B walk and eventually an A walk. For most people, walking is a safe and effective form of exercise. However, if you have any concerns or are at all worried about your health, discuss this with your doctor. Changing lifelong habits requires determination and courage. We can make it much easier for the next generation by introducing them to walking early in life. Families and children are most welcome. Hope to see you on the walks.
What to Wear text box a brilliant walking club

What to Wear

What do I need for a walk? A pair of walking boots (essential ), a rucksack, a waterproof jacket (to protect you from the wind and rain), a fleece jacket, outdoor trousers, a hat and gloves, a change of clothing, something to drink, something to eat etc. Water is important to carry with you to keep you hydrated. A walking pole is useful, and a whistle and plastic survival bag should be carried for emergencies. Also a pair of gaiters, overtrousers, spare clothing, are optional but often desirable when walking in higher altitudes. A small personal first aid kit is also recommended, plasters, gauze, antiseptic ointment and the like. Blisters can sometimes occur when walking in boots that you have worn without problems for years. Do not wear denim trousers (jeans). They give no warmth when wet, they weigh a ton and cling to your legs, sapping your energy and making it very tiring to walk. Best to use trousers made from a technical material. These repel the wind and light rain. When wet they dry out very quickly and are tailored in such a way to allow easy movement whilst out on the hills. My favourite is mentioned in this mini-review I found here. Craghoppers Kiwi Pro Active Trousers “If we offered a ‘Best Value’ award these popular trousers would win – for £45 (often found for much less) there is a choice of three leg lengths and a pair of trousers with impressive features. The fabric has just the right amount of stretch, while drying quickly and resisting moisture and abrasion well, oh, and it has UPF 40 protection against UV rays. The ‘Pro Active’ model has a slightly closer cut than the normal Kiwi trousers, so there’s no flappy material at the calf, plus you get an articulated knee and zipped pockets – one thigh, two handwarmer and one rear – all with reversed zips. The waistband is part-elasticated and has belt loops, and fastens with a normal button and zipped fly. I like the removable glasses cloth inside the left handwarmer pocket – it’s unobtrusive and a nice touch, similarly the webbing heel reinforcement. They’re smart too, but only available in black. Fabric: Solar Shield Stretch (96% polyamide, 4% elastane)” Do not wear cotton clothing next to your skin, (T-shirts etc.) for the same reason, wear a man- made nylon/polyester type vest or top. These act as a thermal layer, separating your skin from the cold wetness of rain or sweat which will draw away your body heat rapidly, making you feel chilled and unhappy. What about safety considerations? Your leader will be an ordinary club member who is unpaid, however all leaders will be competent navigators and in many cases, will have been leading parties for a number of years. While the leader has undertaken to lead his/her party for the day, you should be aware that you are ultimately responsible for your own safety and should follow their advice. Please do not go ahead of the leader or depart from the party without speaking to the leader first. There are few rules, but these have developed over time for the general safety and comfort of club members. Smoking is not permitted on the coach. Alcoholic drinks are not allowed to be consumed on the walks or on the coach. You will usually have time at the end of the walk for a sociable drink in a pub or tearoom/cafe before going home. We also regret that dogs cannot be allowed on club walks since this may cause problems with landowners and livestock farmers. The club has an excellent safety record because of its level of organisation and the broad range of experience that has been built up over many years of operation. There is no other club in the West of Lancashire that offers such a wide and varied programme of such frequency throughout the year. Notes: All sporting and leisure activities have inherent hazards associated with them and rambling is no exception. In spite of the safety of members always being of the paramount concern, accidents will occasionally occur. It is important therefore, that when entering into the activity, each member appreciates that they have a responsibility to identify and take all reasonable precautions to eliminate or minimise the potential for an accident to arise.
Food and drinks should be taken, strong walking boots are essential. Take warm clothes and waterproofs. The fell tops can be much colder than the valleys. A change of clothes can be left on the coach.
Latest News text box

Latest News

Snowdonia walking weekend

Last year was a great success and another walking weekend is planned for this year. This time the accomodation will be at the Snowdon Ranger YHA, where they will provide bed, breakfast, and an evening meal. The cost per person for this accommodation is very reasonable (similar to last year). You will be expected to make your own travel arrangements. In the past this has been done by car sharing and sharing fuel costs. If you are interested please contact Jeanne Creighton.
Navigate to the next page> “Walks”
More info
Home More info Walks Join Gallery Contact Affiliated to the Ramblers Association black bar black bar Fylde Coast Ramblers logo contact email button facebook link to Fylde Coast Ramblers Happy Blackpool Walking member a brilliant walking club

More Info

We are a friendly and unpretentious walking club based on the Fylde Coast in Lancashire. We have walks planned for almost every weekend. Transfer to the destinations is mainly by coach, with collection points in St.Annes on Sea, Blackpool, Cleveleys, Thornton Cleveleys and Poulton le Fylde. Popular destinations can be the Lake District, Yorkshire Dales, Derbyshire’s Peak District, North Wales (Snowdonia) and Lancashire. Have a look here to see our future destinations. All walks have experienced leaders and are graded to suit different levels of fitness. Are you interested in friendship through walking? Do you want to get fit? Then take a look at what we do, and how you can join us.
Health Matters text box

Health Matters

Walking is the most natural form of movement, and an

excellent all-round mode of exercise. Yet as a nation we are

walking less and less. Walking can help you to:

    * Improve your general health     * Get fit and stay fit     * Control your weight     * Live longer! Walking helps protect the body from many illnesses and conditions: heart disease and stroke, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, obesity, depression, some types of diabetes and colon cancer. Health experts agree that 30 minutes brisk walking on most days of the week is sufficient to improve fitness. However like a lot of things in life that we are supposed to do, daily exercise can become a chore. A much more enjoyable way is to join us every weekend and walk in the beautiful countryside, with good company. All you need is some sensible clothing/footwear and the price of the coach fare. This gradual start to walking can help people who feel they are not active enough to change their day to day habits through the simple activity of walking more. If your main aim is to lose weight, you need to use more calories through physical activity than you take in as food. This means doing as much as possible: short walks, longer walks, climbing stairs – every bit of physical activity counts toward the total number of calories burned off. If you recovering from an illness/operation and your main aim is to increase your fitness, it is important to gradually increase the intensity of your exercise. This can be achieved by coming on a short walk or part of the C walk. Then as you improve your level of fitness you can take on a B walk and eventually an A walk. For most people, walking is a safe and effective form of exercise. However, if you have any concerns or are at all worried about your health, discuss this with your doctor. Changing lifelong habits requires determination and courage. We can make it much easier for the next generation by introducing them to walking early in life. Families and children are most welcome. Hope to see you on the walks.
What to Wear text box

What to Wear

What do I need for a walk? A pair of walking boots (essential ), a rucksack, a waterproof jacket (to protect you from the wind and rain), a fleece jacket, outdoor trousers, a hat and gloves, a change of clothing, something to drink, something to eat etc. Water is important to carry with you to keep you hydrated. A walking pole is useful, and a whistle and plastic survival bag should be carried for emergencies. Also a pair of gaiters, overtrousers, spare clothing, are optional but often desirable when walking in higher altitudes. A small personal first aid kit is also recommended, plasters, gauze, antiseptic ointment and the like. Blisters can sometimes occur when walking in boots that you have worn without problems for years. Do not wear denim trousers (jeans). They give no warmth when wet, they weigh a ton and cling to your legs, sapping your energy and making it very tiring to walk. Best to use trousers made from a technical material. These repel the wind and light rain. When wet they dry out very quickly and are tailored in such a way to allow easy movement whilst out on the hills. My favourite is mentioned in this mini-review I found here. Craghoppers Kiwi Pro Active Trousers “If we offered a ‘Best Value’ award these popular trousers would win – for £45 (often found for much less) there is a choice of three leg lengths and a pair of trousers with impressive features. The fabric has just the right amount of stretch, while drying quickly and resisting moisture and abrasion well, oh, and it has UPF 40 protection against UV rays. The ‘Pro Active’ model has a slightly closer cut than the normal Kiwi trousers, so there’s no flappy material at the calf, plus you get an articulated knee and zipped pockets – one thigh, two handwarmer and one rear – all with reversed zips. The waistband is part- elasticated and has belt loops, and fastens with a normal button and zipped fly. I like the removable glasses cloth inside the left handwarmer pocket – it’s unobtrusive and a nice touch, similarly the webbing heel reinforcement. They’re smart too, but only available in black. Fabric: Solar Shield Stretch (96% polyamide, 4% elastane)” Do not wear cotton clothing next to your skin, (T-shirts etc.) for the same reason, wear a man-made nylon/polyester type vest or top. These act as a thermal layer, separating your skin from the cold wetness of rain or sweat which will draw away your body heat rapidly, making you feel chilled and unhappy. What about safety considerations? Your leader will be an ordinary club member who is unpaid, however all leaders will be competent navigators and in many cases, will have been leading parties for a number of years. While the leader has undertaken to lead his/her party for the day, you should be aware that you are ultimately responsible for your own safety and should follow their advice. Please do not go ahead of the leader or depart from the party without speaking to the leader first. There are few rules, but these have developed over time for the general safety and comfort of club members. Smoking is not permitted on the coach. Alcoholic drinks are not allowed to be consumed on the walks or on the coach. You will usually have time at the end of the walk for a sociable drink in a pub or tearoom/cafe before going home. We also regret that dogs cannot be allowed on club walks since this may cause problems with landowners and livestock farmers The club has an excellent safety record because of its level of organisation and the broad range of experience that has been built up over many years of operation. There is no other club in the West of Lancashire that offers such a wide and varied programme of such frequency throughout the year. Notes: All sporting and leisure activities have inherent hazards associated with them and rambling is no exception. In spite of the safety of members always being of the paramount concern, accidents will occasionally occur. It is important therefore, that when entering into the activity, each member appreciates that they have a responsibility to identify and take all reasonable precautions to eliminate or minimise the potential for an accident to arise.
Food and drinks should be taken, strong walking boots are essential. Take warm clothes and waterproofs. The fell tops can be much colder than the valleys. A change of clothes can be left on the coach.
© Fylde Coast Ramblers - This website is compliant with the new EU cookie law Fylde Coast Ramblers is affiliated to the Ramblers Association. Our affiliation number is 591570
Latest News text box

Latest News

Snowdonia walking weekend

Last year was a great success and another walking weekend is planned for this year. This time the accomodation will be at the Snowdon Ranger YHA, where they will provide bed, breakfast, and an evening meal. The cost per person for this accommodation is very reasonable (similar to last year). You will be expected to make your own travel arrangements. In the past this has been done by car sharing and sharing fuel costs. If you are interested please contact Jeanne Creighton.
Navigate to the next page> “Walks”
More info
Navigation Menu Affiliated to the Ramblers Association black bar black bar Fylde Coast Ramblers logo contact email button facebook link to Fylde Coast Ramblers Happy Blackpool Walking member
Food and drinks should be taken, strong walking boots are essential. Take warm clothes and waterproofs. The fell tops can be much colder than the valleys. A change of clothes can be left on the coach.
What to Wear text box

What to Wear

What do I need for a walk? A pair of walking boots (essential ), a rucksack, a waterproof jacket (to protect you from the wind and rain), a fleece jacket, outdoor trousers, a hat and gloves, a change of clothing, something to drink, something to eat etc. Water is important to carry with you to keep you hydrated. A walking pole is useful, and a whistle and plastic survival bag should be carried for emergencies. Also a pair of gaiters, overtrousers, spare clothing, are optional but often desirable when walking in higher altitudes. A small personal first aid kit is also recommended, plasters, gauze, antiseptic ointment and the like. Blisters can sometimes occur when walking in boots that you have worn without problems for years. Do not wear denim trousers (jeans). They give no warmth when wet, they weigh a ton and cling to your legs, sapping your energy and making it very tiring to walk. Best to use trousers made from a technical material. These repel the wind and light rain. When wet they dry out very quickly and are tailored in such a way to allow easy movement whilst out on the hills. My favourite is mentioned in this mini-review I found here. Craghoppers Kiwi Pro Active Trousers “If we offered a ‘Best Value’ award these popular trousers would win – for £45 (often found for much less) there is a choice of three leg lengths and a pair of trousers with impressive features. The fabric has just the right amount of stretch, while drying quickly and resisting moisture and abrasion well, oh, and it has UPF 40 protection against UV rays. The ‘Pro Active’ model has a slightly closer cut than the normal Kiwi trousers, so there’s no flappy material at the calf, plus you get an articulated knee and zipped pockets (one thigh, two handwarmer and one rear) all with reversed zips. The waistband is part- elasticated and has belt loops, and fastens with a normal button and zipped fly. I like the removable glasses cloth inside the left handwarmer pocket – it’s unobtrusive and a nice touch, similarly the webbing heel reinforcement. They’re smart too, but only available in black. Fabric: Solar Shield Stretch (96% polyamide, 4% elastane)” Do not wear cotton clothing next to your skin, (T-shirts etc.) for the same reason, wear a man- made nylon/polyester type vest or top. These act as a thermal layer, separating your skin from the cold wetness of rain or sweat which will draw away your body heat rapidly, making you feel chilled and unhappy. What about safety considerations? Your leader will be an ordinary club member who is unpaid, however all leaders will be competent navigators and in many cases, will have been leading parties for a number of years. While the leader has undertaken to lead his/her party for the day, you should be aware that you are ultimately responsible for your own safety and should follow their advice. Please do not go ahead of the leader or depart from the party without speaking to the leader first. There are few rules, but these have developed over time for the general safety and comfort of club members. Smoking is not permitted on the coach. Alcoholic drinks are not allowed to be consumed on the walks or on the coach. You will usually have time at the end of the walk for a sociable drink in a pub or tearoom/cafe before going home. We also regret that dogs cannot be allowed on club walks since this may cause problems with landowners and livestock farmers. The club has an excellent safety record because of its level of organisation and the broad range of experience that has been built up over many years of operation. There is no other club in the West of Lancashire that offers such a wide and varied programme of such frequency throughout the year. Notes: All sporting and leisure activities have inherent hazards associated with them and rambling is no exception. In spite of the safety of members always being of the paramount concern, accidents will occasionally occur. It is important therefore, that when entering into the activity, each member appreciates that they have a responsibility to identify and take all reasonable precautions to eliminate or minimise the potential for an accident to arise.
Health Matters text box

Health Matters

Walking is the most natural form of movement,

and an excellent all-round mode of exercise. Yet

as a nation we are walking less and less. Walking

can help you to:

    * Improve your general health     * Get fit and stay fit     * Control your weight     * Live longer! Walking helps protect the body from many illnesses and conditions: heart disease and stroke, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, obesity, depression, some types of diabetes and colon cancer. Health experts agree that 30 minutes brisk walking on most days of the week is sufficient to improve fitness. However like a lot of things in life that we are supposed to do, daily exercise can become a chore. A much more enjoyable way is to join us every weekend and walk in the beautiful countryside, with good company. All you need is some sensible clothing/footwear and the price of the coach fare. This gradual start to walking can help people who feel they are not active enough to change their day to day habits through the simple activity of walking more. If your main aim is to lose weight, you need to use more calories through physical activity than you take in as food. This means doing as much as possible: short walks, longer walks, climbing stairs – every bit of physical activity counts toward the total number of calories burned off. If you recovering from an illness/operation and your main aim is to increase your fitness, it is important to gradually increase the intensity of your exercise. This can be achieved by coming on a short walk or part of the C walk. Then as you improve your level of fitness you can take on a B walk and eventually an A walk. For most people, walking is a safe and effective form of exercise. However, if you have any concerns or are at all worried about your health, discuss this with your doctor. Changing lifelong habits requires determination and courage. We can make it much easier for the next generation by introducing them to walking early in life. Families and children are most welcome. Hope to see you on the walks.
a brilliant walking club

More Info

We are a friendly and unpretentious walking club based on the Fylde Coast in Lancashire. We have walks planned for almost every weekend. Transfer to the destinations is mainly by coach, with collection points in St.Annes on Sea, Blackpool, Cleveleys, Thornton Cleveleys and Poulton le Fylde. Popular destinations can be the Lake District, Yorkshire Dales, Derbyshire’s Peak District, North Wales (Snowdonia) and Lancashire. Have a look here to see our future destinations. All walks have experienced leaders and are graded to suit different levels of fitness. Are you interested in friendship through walking? Do you want to get fit? Then take a look at what we do, and how you can join us.
© Fylde Coast Ramblers - This website is compliant with the new EU cookie law Fylde Coast Ramblers is affiliated to the Ramblers Association. Our affiliation number is 591570
Latest News text box

Latest News

Snowdonia walking weekend

Last year was a great success and another walking weekend is planned for this year. This time the accomodation will be at the Snowdon Ranger YHA, where they will provide bed, breakfast, and an evening meal. The cost per person for this accommodation is very reasonable (similar to last year). You will be expected to make your own travel arrangements. In the past this has been done by car sharing and sharing fuel costs. If you are interested please contact Jeanne Creighton.
Navigate to the next page> “Walks”